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Site Crash

What is Site Crash?

Do you want more people coming to your website ? And do you want them staying for longer and recommending you to others? Then let me introduce Site Crash.

I’ve improved websites for several years, tightening up the content and vastly increasing traffic, and while it’s great getting paid to do this, it’s time to give something back to charities, voluntary sites and other places that deserve more traffic but may not have the time or resources to do the work needed to improve them.

I’m an editorial expert – I look at not just spelling and grammar, but whether a site is confusingly over-written. You know what I mean, those bitter flavours on the English tongue – meaningless jargon, buzzwords, business-speke. More importantly, I’ll look at how you’re selling your site.

Site Crash logo
Site Crash

Selling a site

Everything is sold.

Think of the last film you saw, you can probably sum up in a few words why you chose it and what you were expecting (although whether it lived up to expectations is another matter, but at least the selling worked). Think too of the last luxury you bought, it met some perceived need. Think also of the last… well, you get the picture.

Everybody sells.
Whether it’s themselves, products or services, your website is your pitch to the world at large. However, we don’t always do it well – key information is missing or confusing, the unique selling point – why people should use you and your site rather than the hundreds of millions of other sites out there – is not obvious.

Key content

When people visit our site, we sell ourselves through our content – mainly writing, but also images, audio and video. This may sound distasteful to some, but we when there are only a few words, a few seconds to sell, you need to do it well.

In addition, your audience (and that’s assuming you even know who your audience is) needs to find you. Good content, the right content that makes use of the different tools of the web can help do this.

This is where Site Crash comes in.

Site Crash

Site Crash is purely voluntary, only the sites where you the owner has invited me will be critiqued here. I’ve based it on similar expert-advice sites such as Janet Reid’s Query Shark and Nathan Bransford’s Page Critiques.

Like them, any criticism will be constructive, and the comments on each post are also encouraged to be constructive. Those that are clearly not will be removed.

The focus will be on how you use your content and the things you could do or add to improve the site, and ways to think about your content.

You will be given key points to digest, and a suggested timeline and priorities and I would like to follow up a few months down the line.

By the end of the Site Crash you will have some key points and, ideally, simple things you can do to make your site better and increase traffic. And who doesn’t want that?

What’s needed

If you’re interested I’ll need a few things from you.

First I’ll need your website’s URL, obviously. Then I need to know the aim or point of your site, as well as your resources. Don’t worry, I won’t publish your resources or any other confidential information, but I do need to know what you’ve got to work with, including how the web is hosted (is it you, an independent company, a friend…)

Once you’ve done that, I’ll get back to you to let you know if I’m having a look and will do my best to post something constructive as soon as I can, although please be aware that this will all be done in my own free time.

So if you’re interested, drop me an email at editor AT ConsideredWords DOT com.

If you could send from an email account that’s part of your site rather than Gmail etc this will enable me to ensure that you are the site owner. Otherwise I’ll have to ask for some other proof of ownership.

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News

For your consideration

This is a gathering, a gathering of equals with a special purpose – to share knowledge and change the way we think about writing, to treat writing as a profession. We’ll do this by going beyond traditional writing sources, to study sociology, psychology, advertising – anything to help us understand more about our audience. People.

Writing professionally doesn’t mean earning a living from it, it means that writing is treated as any other job – with the same dedication, investment in time, and development. And like other jobs, the best way to advance and succeed is with the help, support, advice and experience of others.

Welcome
For your consideration

Principles and focus

Unlike other writing sites, Considered Words has a clear purpose, with principles and promises for you the reader, and clear areas of specialisation:

  • Content is king regardless of the medium. It seems that every man and his dog has a site or blog, but just because you can write an email doesn’t mean you can engage with an audience. Considered Words is here to discover and propose ways to make any message be put out in an engaging way and change the way we think about content.
  • Scientific research over personal experience and commentary. Storytelling is about people yet all other writing sites ignore the wealth of research into how humans act and interact, merely focusing on their own lives.
  • Relevant personal experience. Yet while we shall focus on original research and studies, that’s not to say that we won’t publish personal experience and opinion. However, it’ll always be relevant and always have a point.

Show not tell

My time has been spent writing content for various organisations but as the web becomes more focused on the individual, isn’t it time we content creators had our own voice? I’ve carried out a vast amount of research into how people work, how we write, and how to write well. Now’s the time to share it, and for others to share their own work.

I started this site because I believe in show over tell. It’s one thing to tell others that you’re a writer, it’s another to show them your style, what you write about and how you present yourself.

However, you don’t need to write for this site to join the convocation. Your readership and comments are valued, as is your sharing of essays and articles with others, showing others what you value.

The future

Both myself and others have a wide range of articles scheduled to grab your interest. Here’s a taster:

  • The Gobshite Index, or, bloggers and the (wrong) words they use
  • The consummate professionals you wouldn’t expect
  • Why you need to be a better liar
  • Site Crash – ways to improve a site’s content
  • My Writing Failures
  • The second joke
  • The words we need

So come, join us in considering words.

Categories
Editor's Pick Jonathan Richardson Professional Writing

Writing as a profession

Data analysis and psychological studies show that treating writing as a profession is the most important way of achieving success, whether it is dreams of being a writer, blogger, selling online, or any one of the myriad ways we present ourselves through writing.

It’s important then that we act now. Statistics show that in 2010 we presented ourselves and our ideas through writing and other creative means more so than at any point in human history.

Yet while the technology has allowed us to change how we write and produce more, our attitude towards writing has not altered.

Writing on the mind
Writing on the mind

Profession and writing

The reason that we don’t think of writing as a profession is because most of us think we don’t need to, our attitudes are still stuck in the 20th century, whereas the range and scope of our writing is firmly in the 21st.

Categories
Editor's Pick Jonathan Richardson Original Writing

My rules of writing

  1. Treat it professionally.
  2. Have heroes and study them and their work. Aim to become one yourself.
  3. Know where you want to be and a rough idea of how you get there – but don’t be afraid to adapt if needed.
  4. Critique, critique, critique. But don’t feel superior as “there’s an awful lot of rubbish out there”. Of course it’s rubbish, if you’re not the target audience, and if you do deem it rubbish say why.
  5. Research. Research writing, research themes, research characters, but most of all, research people. I’m more interested in what a sociologist or psychologist has to say about character than an English graduate.
  6. Have something to say.

Why have them

These are my personal rules on writing and I will no doubt add to them (and the following statements) over time, but these are my core rules. Not principles; rules that I intend to follow for whatever I write – fact or fiction, drama or comedy, essays or scripts.

Categories
General Jonathan Richardson Site Crash

What is Site Crash?

Do you want more people coming to your website ? And do you want them staying for longer and recommending you to others? Then let me introduce Site Crash.

I’ve improved websites for several years, tightening up the content and vastly increasing traffic, and while it’s great getting paid to do this, it’s time to give something back to charities, voluntary sites and other places that deserve more traffic but may not have the time or resources to do the work needed to improve them.

I’m an editorial expert – I look at not just spelling and grammar, but whether a site is confusingly over-written. You know what I mean, those bitter flavours on the English tongue – meaningless jargon, buzzwords, business-speke. More importantly, I’ll look at how you’re selling your site.

Site Crash

Selling a site

Everything is sold.

Categories
Editor's Pick Jonathan Richardson Original Writing

Welcome to the convocation

A convocation is both the act of calling together, and the assembly of, a group for a special purpose. The special purpose of jonvocation is to gather others who take writing professionally.

Writing professionally doesn’t mean earning a living from it, it means that writing is treated as any other job – with the same dedication, investment in time, and development. And like other jobs, the best way to advance and succeed is with the help, support, advice and experience of others.

Welcome
Welcome

Principles and focus

Unlike other writing sites, jonvocation has a clear purpose, with principles and promises for you the reader, and clear areas of specialisation: